Smile! The world is a beautiful place (^_^)

Posts tagged “photography

2018-20

Two different takes on two different kinds of butterflies-

(1) Speckled Wood (Pararge aegeria), photographed today with Fuji 18-135 mm + Raynox 150. Goal was to get close to the butterfly and capture as much detail as possible. Picture not edited except it’s been slightly cropped.

(2) Green-veined white (Pieris napi), photographed with Pentacon 50 mm. Goal was to capture the moody light in the forest, not so much details in the butterfly (although enough to determine that it’s a female spring brood). Picture not edited or cropped.

Would you do me a favor and let me know which one you prefer? Not saying one is “better” than the other, but just curious to know your preference. You can use the voting buttons below! Thanks 🙂


2018-19

A little Jet ant (Lasius fuliginosus) enjoying a beautiful day in the forest… Photos taken with Pentacon, this lens is about 45 years old (made in East Germany), and really nice to use. It’s not super sharp when shot open wide at f1.8, but that wasn’t the purpose of these shots anyway. 😉

“Sharpness really isn’t all it’s cracked up to be in my book. I’d rather look at an image with soft gloomy highlights with aberrations all over the place, than a clinically perfect super shot. It’s the same with human beings. It’s our flaws that make us unique. It’s these flaws that enhance beauty by giving us an immediate reference through presence of the less-than-perfect.”
Jonas Rask – official Fujifilm X-Photographer

The plant is known as cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris), it’s a herbaceous biennial or short-lived perennial plant in the family Apiaceae (Umbelliferae).


2018-18

Week 18! I’m very excited to share these images with you, they’re taken with a very old lens: Pentacon 50 mm f1.8. It’s got an M-42 mount so with an adapter I can use it on my Fuji camera. And I *love* this lens! Really, it has everything I’d ever wanted in a lens: It’s sharp where it’s supposed to be and soft where it’s supposed to be (with very nice, kind of dreamy bokeh).

Modern lenses are usually big and heavy because of their autofocus functions. Old lenses don’t have autofocus, thus a fraction of the size and weight even though they’re made of metal and not plastic. You can find this fantastic little lens at flea markets or charity shops for  20-25 Euro. I kid you not! If you see one, please do yourself a favor and buy it because that’s a purchase you’ll never regret.

If you’re worried about shooting in full manual mode, please don’t be. See it as an opportunity to become a better photographer! Nowadays, everyone’s snapping away with cameras that have several automatic settings and autofocus. Shooting in manual mode means you have to take the time to really think about what you want to photograph and how to do it; You have to set the focus, aperture, etc. manually and soon you’ll have a much better understanding of light and composition as well.

Pictures taken in Amsterdamse Bos today. I don’t want to post too many pictures at once, so I’ve selected only 3 examples of what this lens can do. No filters or photoshopping has been done, besides adding a small signature, these pictures are straight out of camera.

Red forest ant

Bubble bokeh

The Map (Araschnia levana) is a beautiful but skittish little butterfly. The most unusual fact about this butterfly is that its two annual broods look very different. The summer brood are black with white markings, looking like a miniature version of the White admiral and lacking most of the orange of the pictured spring brood.


2018-17

Week 17! Two green pictures: one bug and one flower.

First, a picture of a Green dock beetle (Gastrophysa viridula). They have a shiny, metallic sheen that’s primarily green but also gold, bronze and brass colors depending on their age and which light you see them in. If you see a metallic green little beetle and wonder how to identify which one it is, you can look at the legs – Green dock beetles have metallic green legs while most others have all black legs. This one was only 4 mm long so I think it’s a male (females are bigger).

(More info and pictures of a female dock beetle here)

Garlic mustard flower (Alliara petiolata) is a biennial plant, i.e. it’s a flowering plant that takes two years to complete its biological lifecycle. In its first year it forms clumps of round shaped, slightly wrinkled leaves, that when crushed smell like garlic. In the next year it produces these beautiful cross shaped white flowers in the spring.


2018-16

Today I saw several Speckled Wood (Pararge aegeria) butterflies! They usually fly from the beginning of April until the end of October – in three overlapping generations! Because they are able to overwinter in two totally separated development stages (Note 1), they have a complicated pattern of several adult flights per year.

Note 1: They enter the caterpillar stage between half May and half September. The growth speed differs significantly between them and some caterpillars grow as much as 3 times faster than others! Those will overwinter as pupae. The ones that emerge from the egg stage and become caterpillars in mid-August will spend the winter as half-grown larvae.

These butterflies are very territorial, and most of those I saw today were males engaged in battles (Note 2). This happens when one male has claimed a nice spot of sunlight that pierces through the trees and another male flies through his sunspot. Note that this only happens if the other male is of the same species, if a male of another kind of butterfly enters the spot he’s totally ignored. If a female flies through the sunspot, the male flies after and tries to mate with her. But otherwise he’ll remain in the same sunspot until the evening (he’ll follow the sunspot as it moves across the forest floor) and then spend the night high up in the trees.

Note 2: If you’ve never seen one of these battles and are now trying to picture what it looks like: to be honest, it looks kind of lame. The “resident” male flies towards the intruder, and then the pair flies upwards in a spiral pattern (no body contact). The one that keeps at it the longest wins. It’s usually over in a few seconds, but the longest documented battle between two male Speckled Wood butterflies went on for 94 minutes.

PS. One of my photos has been published on Natuurfotografie, the #1 platform for nature photography in The Netherlands and Belgium. If you can read Dutch, please take a look here.


2018-15

There are many “firsts” this time of the year! Here are the first flies of the year as well –

The first picture shows a Flesh fly (Sarcophagidae) sunbathing on a staircase. Flesh flies look a lot like house flies, but are generally larger. They are gray, have a checkerboard pattern on the top of their abdomen, three black stripes running along the top surface of their thorax just behind the head, while house flies have four, and sometimes a reddish-brown tip at the end of the abdomen.

The second picture shows a Yellow dung fly (Scathophaga stercoraria), or – if you want to make the name sound a bit nicer, which could be a challenge for a dung fly – also known as Golden dung fly. I think it’s a female as she has a more of a green tone to her rather than yellow. These flies are very important in the scientific world due to their short life cycles and susceptibility to experimental manipulations, thus have contributed significant knowledge about animal behavior.

 


2018-14

Yay, first butterflies of the year! The European Peacock butterfly (Aglais io) usually spend the winters in buildings or trees, and therefore often appear quite early in the spring.  Before it goes into hibernation, it convert some of their blood sugar into glycerol which works as a kind of “anti-freeze” during the cold winter. Clever, eh! After hibernation (March or April), it will lay its eggs, often in batches of 500 (!) at a time and several layers deep to increase the chance that some will be protected from desiccation and birds. In the next coming weeks, the adults have lived for almost a year and they die of old age. Around the same time, the caterpillars of the next generation hatch and in July they form chrysalides, in August they emerge as adults, and in September they go into hibernation. And so the cycle goes on!

Note: It shouldn’t be confused with the American Peacock butterfly (Anartia), they’re not closely related.

More interesting information and pictures can be found on this excellent learning site here


2018-13

Happy Easter everyone!

My beloved Fuji X-T1 can only do double exposures, not multiple as some other cameras can (up to 10, I think?). My workaround was to take several double exposures and then merge them in a software. It was the first time I’ve tried it, but certainly not the last. So much fun to discover and play around with new techniques 🙂 If anyone has any advice on how to take/make ME’s, please share!

(i) Multiple exposure

(ii) Double exposure (in camera)


2018-12

The bees are back! 🙂 Three photos I shot earlier today of lovely little honey bees (Apis mellifera) collecting pollen.

The bee in the first picture as a nice basket on her hind leg:

"Unique among all God's creatures, only the honeybee improves the environment and preys not on any other species."
- Royden Brown (author of 'Bee Hive Product Bible')

2018-11

Slowly.. small flowers start to pop up here and there! Some people regard the daisy (Bellis perennis) and coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara) as weed, but they are beautiful and both these are used in traditional herbal medicine so they’re useful as well 🙂